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Showing most liked content on 03/26/18 in all areas

  1. 1 like
    Hi, Thanks a lot for the script, this is what i exactly looking for. I have added the command to save the file in some location before closing.
  2. 1 like
    Yes , the lack in running script was due to streaming of Large Data to tkcon command window. It can be resolved by adding command like ;puts " " or ;puts ok in the same line (line which is slowing down the process). This would help not to display the whole data of previous command and the tcl variable can be easily populated with values (with no delay). Regards Piyush
  3. 1 like
    Hi @tinh I am really thankful for your suggestion. It worked for me. Sorry to say but I cannot share tcl file content or any model content, as it is under confidential proprietory of Company. I just need to know using "::hwat::utils::CreateMark" can also work for such problems ? Regards Piyush
  4. 1 like
    Hi, /FAIL/JOHNSON and /FAIL/TAB1 are very similar and work on the same basic idea where a plastic failure strain versus stress triaxility curve has to be defined. In /FAIL/JOHNSON the plastic failure strain versus stress triaxility is created by defining the D1, D2 , D3 parameters which are used in the Johnson-Cook equation. In /FAIL/TAB1, the user defines a /FUNCT which represents the plastic failure strain versus stress triaxility curves. In /FAIL/TAB1 you can define different /FUNCT which represent different plastic failure strain versus stress triaxility curves at different strain rates. In /FAIL/JOHNSON the strain rate affect is defined via the D4 parameter input. So you should not need to use both /FAIL/TAB1 and /FAIL/JOHNSON in the same model since they do the same thing. If you have a plastic strain at failure for compresion (trixaility= -1/3) shear ((trixaility= 0) and tension (trixaility= 1/3) then you can do a curve fit to calculate the D1, D2, and D3 paramters. You could also look at /FAIL/BIQUAD which uses two quadratic equations to define the plastic failure strain versus stress triaxility curves and has some built in starting values for some different materials. Thanks, Andy
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