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strees(t) vs von-mises(s)

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I am performing stress analysis of component assembly having a solid block and a shell plate connected to each other.My question is what is the difference between stress(t) and von-mises ?

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Von Mises stress is used to check whether their design will withstand a given load condition, that is  if a given material will yield or fracture.

Stress(t) is the stress tensor results. There are many open web resources available on this topic and I recommend you to go through the same.

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QUE: Why and when do we go for stress (t)?

  1. In my case, when I attach 2D shell to the hex meshing, I notice von mises (s) stress is much lesser in shell portion as compared to the hex portion. When I select Stress (t) and go for von mises, I find comparable stress values in shell part as that of the von mises (s) stress of the previous case (in the solid part) . What does it mean? Please explain.
  2. Does it mean when we have to see the stresses of the shell part, we go for the von mises in the stress (t) option?
  3. You said we use von mises stress is when we want to check when my failure may occur. Which von mises stress do you mean by that? Von mises (s) or the von mises option in the stress (t) option? [Actually I have an assembly containing solid shell parts].

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Hi,

The tensor results is a description about what happens in one direction due to the happenings in other directions. As an example, sigma_xx is the stress acting in the x direction due to a force acting in the x-direction. Similarly in other directions also.

For Von Mises in tensor is calculated using  principal stresses (please go through the document shared in the last reply), and there will be some variation in scalar and tensor values.

We normally check for scalar values.

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