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raskolnikov

Definition of cp and cp-total

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I'm not sure I completely understand the question.  The quantity written as 'pressure' by AcuSolve is static pressure (P).  Total Pressure would be static pressure plus dynamic pressure - or P + 1/2 * Rho * Vel^2.  You can create variables using math functions in AcuFieldView by f_x icon towards the top of the AcuFieldView main window.

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Hi acupro,

 

sorry for the misunderstanding of my question. I will try to explain better:

For VWT Simulations i need to define the pressure coefficient to show the pressure distributions on a car. I think, the formula for that is following from ydigits description:

 

("pressure"-0)/(0.5*"vwtRho"*("velocity_magnitude"+"vwtVel")^2)

 

At this point, there are some questions: where is the variable "velocity_magnitude" from? Theoretically it should be without velocity magnitude.

Why is the reference free stream pressure 0?

My expectation is to see the cp value 1 at stagnation point of the car. But it is around 2 or 3 according to VWT analysis report. How could it be like that?

I am a bit confused because of this. Maybe i miss an important point by the way.

 

Thanks for your help.

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It seems there may be a mistake in that formula.  You wouldn't sum velocity_magnitude and vwtVel - the 'velocity' term squared should be the overall freestream velocity, which is likely vwtVwl.  The pressure difference would be the local static pressure P minus some reference pressure.  You could use the integrated static pressure at the inlet for the reference pressure.  I suppose you could also use the integrated pressure at the outlet, which may be 0 if that is the boundary condition used.  So long as you always use the same definition, then your comparisons would be valid.

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